On Monday, Business Insider posted yet another Tech Power List, "The 100 Most Influential Tech People On Twitter." Unsurprisingly, there are only 14 women on it, but the editors chose to use Wall Street Journal reporter Evelyn Rusli's photo as the lead image for the piece. BI is not the first publication to use this trick. 

In fact, a quick glance at the big power lists over the past few years shows that editors illustrate said power lists with women who don't rank very high on them. Despite (or because of) the fact that women are underrepresented in business and tech power rankings, editors make sure to get an attractive mid-list woman (or women) on the cover. Here are attempts at diversity from Business Insider, Fortune, and Vanity Fair

Business Insider: The 100 Most Influential Tech People on Twitter

April 2014

Number of women on list: 14 out of 100

Evelyn Rusli's ranking: 33

Fortune: 40 Under 40 in Business 

October 2013

Number of women on list: 16 out of 40

Katia Beauchamp's ranking: 31 

Business Insider: The 27 Most Impressive Students at Harvard Business School

April 2013

Number of women on the list: 10 out of 27

Stephanie Frias and Shereen Khanuja's ranking: 19

Vanity Fair: The New Establishment List

September 2011

Number of women on the list: 7 out of 50

Lady Gaga's ranking: 9

Fortune: 40 Under 40 in Business (2011)

October 2011

Number of women on the list: 6 out of 40

Marissa Mayer and Erin Burnett's rankings: 20 and 33, respectively