The alleged age-ism of the tech scene hasn't just pushed older men to dress like the youngins running the start-ups, it's created a whole new culture of trying to look young. Beyond the tech veterans struggling in a jumping job market — the ones described in a new report by Reuters's Sarah McBride who shave their balding heads for job interviews, then put on a pair of Converses,and ditch the Rolex (because millennials don't wear watches, apparently) — the tech elite are using the same get-hip-quick trickery. And while these guys may rule the tech world, in the Department of Actually Looking Young, the same strategies don't really work. At all:

Trick No. 1: Shaving the Bald Head

The Close Shave: Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer, 56

(Photo at left via Reuters, October 25, 2012; right via Reuters, November 8, 2012)

The Seamless Shave: Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos, 47

(Image via Reuters)

The Full Shave: Former NeXt Engineer Randy Adams, 60

"I don't think I would have been able to get this CEO job if I hadn't shaved my head," he told McBride. 

(image via Forbes)

The Almost-Full Shave: "Tech Veteran" Jeff Spirer, 61

(Image via Reuters)

Trick No. 2: Untucking the Shirt

This is a phenomenon popular among Apple's elite. We think it's supposed to exude "laid-back," but actually it just looks kind of sloppy.

Untucked, a Montage: Greg Joswiak, 50; Phil Schiller, 52; Eddy Cue, 48-ish; Scott Forstall, 44

(Images via Reuters)

Untucked, Boss Edition: Apple CEO Tim Cook, 52

(Image via Reuters)

Untucked, Just-Plain-Sad Edition: Founder of Sling Media Blake Kirkonian, 44

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(Images via AP)

Trick No. 3: Add the Young-Guy Accessory

Words of wisdom on looking young from McBride: "In person, older job applicants should carry a backpack, not a briefcase." Translation: Accessorize young. 

The Old Backpack and Baseball Hat Look: Zynga CEO Mark Pincus, 44

(Images via AP)