Discovered: Why we see the man in the moon, yoga is good for our health, a new species of shark and the first ever image of atoms forming molecules.  

  • Understanding the man on the moon. Not in an emotional way. There's not a real man up there. We can't even really see the optical illusion, but science has figured out what makes the moon looks like it has a man's face on it all the time. First, not all parts of our lunar friend have the same surface, as the photo below shows -- just one side as the craters that to some look like a dude's looking over us. But, for some reason (that science now gets) we always see that side. "In the past, the moon spun around its axis faster than it does today, and their new analysis shows that the fact that the man now faces us may be a result of the rate at which the moon slowed down before becoming locked into its current orientation," explains the write-up of the research. [Icarus
  • Yoga is good for your health. Take that, yoga haters! Science has confirmed that yoga does not kill us, but rather does good things to our bodies. And it's not just inner peace, b.s. "This paper provides a theory, based on neurophysiology and neuroanatomy, to understand how yoga helps patients feel better by relieving symptoms in many common disorders," explains researcher Chris Streeter. This is the second win for yoga enthusiasts this week, with the yoga championships proving the bad-assness of the sport. Yes, sport. [Medical Hypotheses]
  • A new species of catshark. We imagine that discovering new species is fun, so cheers to science for this one. Researchers have found this new guy off the coast of the Galapagos. This is also exciting for the shark population, explains researcher John McCosker. "The discovery of a new shark species is always interesting, particularly at this time when sharks are facing such incredible human pressure," he said. Though, on the human end of things, more sharks sounds scary to us. [California Academy of Sciences]
  • Look at these atoms form a molecule. For the first time ever -- another first, go, science! -- research has recorded the first ever images of atoms coming together to form a molecule, using ultrafast laser pulses. (Cool!) We imagine it's something like the Miracle of Life: Beautiful, nasty and miraculous. [Ohio State]