4:30 p.m.: The buzz on Twitter is that Anonymous has hit the U.S. Department of Homeland Security's website, DHS.gov, with a denial of service attack. The site was out of commission when we tried to visit at 4:30 p.m., but according to Russia Today, it's been up and down over the past half hour or so.

1:42 p.m.: Anonymous's next target: A law firm representing Frank Wuterich, whose name you may recognize as the only Marine convicted of a crime in the Haditha massacre in Iraq in 2005, and who didn't get any prison time. The website for the law firm Puckett and Faraj now looks a lot like that of the Boston Police Department, with red writing on a black background and KRS-One's Sound of the Police playing incessantly. But this attack also includes a massive data dump, with a link to a torrent containing "nearly 3 gigabytes of email correspondence belonging to his attorneys," Russia Today reports. In its screed on the Puckett and Faraj site, Anonymous promises more releases having to do with that recent awful video of Marines urinating on Afghan corpses:

11:23 a.m.: The latest of Anonymous' Friday hacks is replacing the Boston Police Department website BPDNEws with a video for KRS-One's "Sound of Da Police," and a little screed about BPD cracking down on Occupy Boston. The group promises more mayhem during this latest edition of Fuck FBI Friday. If that name sounds familiar, it's because Anonymous-related hackers Lulz Security used it last summer when they hacked into FBI affiliate Infragard.

10:17 a.m.: The hackers at Anonymous promised a big release of hacked information on Friday, and at least part of it is a recording of FBI agents on a conference call with Scotland Yard talking about their mutual investigation into Anonymous. The audio recording (below) contains about 16 minutes of agents chatting about what evidence they've got on already-arrested hackers including Ryan Cleary, Jake Davis (aka Topiary) and Kayla. They also talk about their investigation into a guy named Tehwongz, who apparently hacked into the servers of the gaming platform Steam and got about 30,000 logins.

The call's release means Anonymous has access to the emails of somebody in the FBI involved with the Anonymous investigation, and in the spirit of thumbing their noses at the agency, the hackers also posted to Pastebin the email with login data from the call. A clearly annoyed FBI says it's hunting down those responsible for breaking into the call, but from the sound of things so far, the hackers are a step ahead.