The New York Times Magazine has posted a personal essay that will be unsettling to those of you who can't stop tweeting. In "Confessions of a Tweeter," writer Larry Carlat describes his terrifying descent into a life-destroying Twitter addiction:

Soon my entire life revolved around tweeting. I stopped reading, rarely listened to music or watched TV. When I was out with friends, I would duck into the bathroom with my iPhone. I tweeted while driving, between sets of tennis, even at the movies. (“I love holding your hand in the dark.”) When I wasn’t on Twitter, I would compose faux aphorisms that I might use later. I began to talk that way too. I sounded like a cross between a Barbara Kruger installation and a fortune cookie.

And that's before his addiction starts to mess with his job and his marriage. Predictably, our Twitter follows include many Twitter aficionados who find the account rather chilling. "Scariest thing I've read in months," tweets Politico's Reid Epstein. "Yikes" tweets his colleague, Ben Smith. Nonetheless, Smith has tweeted seven times since then, so, despite Carlat's noble effort, we think this might be a lesson people just have to learn the hard way. Now we're off to figure out how to condense this post into 140 characters ...