More details are emerging about Steve Jobs's final days, and with them, coverage is shifting from how the Apple visionary spent his life to what happens now that he's gone. Inevitably, there's a lot of talk about the money, not only Jobs's $6.7 billion fortune but also the future of the world's most valuable technology that he founded. Nobody seems too concerned that the world's largest technology company is in any jeopardy. The stock has held steady, and the blogs are already buzzing about the next big thing--it's probably a TV. The fate of Jobs's fortune is also the target of speculation, though some are already moving ahead with projects to chronicle (and profit from) telling the story of how he amassed it.

How Steve Jobs spent his final days. The New York Times offers a glimpse into the man's last weeks--the preparations he made for his children, the ways he said goodbye to friends, the security vehicles that guarded his home. Among other things, Jobs had dinner with loved ones and tended to the final drafts of his biography. "Steve made choices," his doctor and friend Dean Ornish told The Times. "I once asked him if he was glad that he had kids, and he said, 'It's 10,000 times better than anything I've ever done.'"

Where Apple will go from here? More than anything Jobs made clear his hope that Apple would carry on his legacy by building more awesome technology. With the iPhone 4S setting sail and the inevitable upgrades to the rest of Apple's products down the line, everybody is wondering what industry the company will disrupt next. It's long been rumored that Apple will make a television--they already have patents filed--and The New York Times now has some speculative details on what that strategy might look like.

What's happening to Steve Jobs's fortune? There's long been criticism directed towards Jobs for not being more philanthropic, like his rival Bill Gates. In life, Jobs was secretive about most things, his spending habits not excluded. According to ABC News, we won't learn much more about what Jobs did or didn't do with his money after his death. Though Reuters reports that Jobs moved three of his estates into trusts in 2009, the general consensus is that the fate of his $6.7 billion fortune will remain under wraps for some time to come.

Who say it's too soon for an off-Broadway show? New York's Public Theater had been planning a production about Jobs's life and psyche for a while, and news of the man's death isn't stopping them. They are, however, changing the tone a bit, though not necessarily clouding the critical lens through which they wanted audiences to view Apple's visionary. "What will really change is the tenor of the crowd," the show's creator and performer Mike Daisey told The Wall Street Journal on Thursday. “Discomfort is usually good. Frankly, discomfort is a fine place for people to be." The title, by the way: The Agony and Ecstasy of Steve Jobs.

When all else fails, the obligatory salutes from Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert. The Comedy Central maestros both paid their respects on Thursday night.

 

The Colbert Report Mon - Thurs 11:30pm / 10:30c
Tribute to Steve Jobs
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The Daily Show With Jon Stewart Mon - Thurs 11p / 10c
Moment of Zen - Steve Jobs' Commencement Speech
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