Though the jury's still out on whether the digital world has truly shaken up traditional power structures, The Pew Research Center has just tossed a fun little nugget into the debate: its new study shows 56 percent of the users of social networking sites are women, up a few percentage points since 2008. The Pew study reports that women also make-up the "majority of the majority of email users (52% women), users of instant message (55%), bloggers (54%), and those who use a photo sharing service (58%)."

The fascinating thing in the chart above, though, is the notable exception: LinkedIn, whose percentages (63 percent male) that are nearly an opposite image of those on Twitter (64 percent female). Twitter, if you recall another recent Pew study, is also quite racially diverse

Given that LinkedIn is the only specifically business and career-oriented site on the list, are these numbers a reflection of the real world's male-dominanted hierarchies, slipping in to pixelated form? Or is it just that men are more into uploading resumes and feeling important on the Internet? We're kind of leaning to the latter, thought it's worth remembering that men do rule certain areas of the world online. Here's some more food for thought: Remember the giant gender imbalance on Wikipedia? We are also skeptical of the health of the female population on Reddit.