Last week we brought you some weird Royal Wedding news including an account of a couple's lucrative adventure at the Jelly Bean Factory in Somerset, England. There, they found a (mango-flavored) jelly bean bearing Kate Middleton's likeness, and boy oh boy did every British newspaper have to report that story. One link got passed around this morning more than others in media circles and if you read between the slashes you can see why:

http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/food-and-drink/utter-PR-fiction-but-people-love-this-shit-so-fuck-it-lets-just-print-it-2269573.html

The link goes to a story about a jelly bean with the supposed likeness of Kate Middleton going on auction. It's just the kind of fluff that journalists hate to write. And while members of the media apparently love the idea of an editor somewhere protesting via URL, many have pointed out that the Independent.co.uk URLs can be changed to whatever you want, as long as the number at the end is left intact. Go ahead, give it a try:

http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/food-and-drink/i-hope-my-editor-doesnt-see-that-line-about-my-staying-up-late-watching-lifetime-movies-but-it-would-still-be-worth-it-2269573.html

So, it's not clear whether this is the work of a disgruntled hack or a media critic. The meme started spreading in British media circles before most American journalists woke up, but it's now in circulation over here, too.
 

We did a little bit of digging in the article source code and found a straightforward G-rated URL. But on Google, a search for "Independent.co.uk Middleton jelly beans" only pulls up the spoof version. So whether it was a snarky reader or a disgruntled editor who started the meme, they must've done it pretty quickly after the story was published.