Georgia Republicans selected candidates for two November races on Tuesday: Former Reebok and Dollar General CEO David Perdue narrowly won the Republican nomination for Georgia's senate seat over 11-term Rep. Jack Kingston. And conservative radio host Jody Hice — who believes there's a gay plot to recruit and sodomize children — won his race to replace Rep. Paul Broun, more than likely securing him a ticket to Congress. 

Perdue narrowly edged out Kingston, despite the latter being backed by the entire Georgia house delegation, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, and most of the state's general assembly. In his concession speech, Kingston argued that Perdue successfully portrayed him as a Washington insider. “People are very frustrated with Washington, D.C., and I think that was a big hurdle,” Kingston said, according to the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. “And my opponent capitalized on that — as he should.”

Democrats believe there's a chance their candidate, philanthropist Michelle Nunn, might be able to beat Perdue. She has name recognition (her father was a well-liked senator), and changing demographics in the state are giving the left improved odds, as Nate Cohn at The Upshot argued. President Obama also lost the state by 8 percent in 2012, but "Nunn, meanwhile, is seen by Democrats as their most promising nonincumbent candidate of 2014, with the best shot at flipping a GOP Senate seat," notes Politico

Less contested is Hice. To paraphrase Mother Jones' profile of him, he's an awful person. In Tim Murphy's words, Hice wrote in a 2012 book that "the gay community has a secret plot to recruit and sodomize children," "supporters of abortion rights are worse than Hitler," and "Muslims be stripped of their First Amendment rights." According to Roll Call, Mitt Romney won the district by 63 percent in 2012 and is in the Safe Republican category by the Rothenberg Political Report/Roll Call ratings system. Rep. Paul Broun, who Hice is running to replace, gave up his House seat for an ill-fated run against Perdue.