A federal judge ruled part of Chicago's gun ordinance unconstitutional on Monday, stating it illegal to have a blanket prohibition on gun stores operating in the city. According to The Chicago Tribune, "U.S. District Judge Edmond Chang found that the city failed to convince him that banning the sale of guns by licensed dealers was necessary to reduce gun violence."

Chang did allow his ruling a delay from taking effect in order to allow the city to appeal. His ruling also made the transfer of a firearm's ownership through gift or private sale, provided the recipient met the standard legal requirements.

The struck-down ordinance was initially adopted in 2010 after a Supreme Court ruling rejected an outright ban on gun ownership within the city. Chicago also has an ongoing case concerning the locations of firing ranges and their ensuing regulations.

Mayor Rahm Emanuel's office responded to the ruling in a statement:

Every year Chicago police recover more illegal guns than officers in any city in the country, a factor of lax federal laws as well as lax laws in Illinois and surrounding state. We need stronger gun safety laws, not increased access to firearms within the city.

While Chang acknowledged the city's notorious problem with gun violence, he wrote that, "Chicago's ordinance goes too far in outright banning legal buyers and legal dealers from engaging in lawful acquisitions and lawful sales of firearms."