With the clock ticking down to the "chaos" that would ensue if the nation's debt limit isn't lifted, here is how House Republicans and President Obama spent Tuesday.

Where the day started

House Republicans adamantly oppose unilaterally extending the debt ceiling, proposing bilateral negotiations. Obama won't meet with Republicans until a debt ceiling extension is passed and the government is reopened with full sequestration-level funding.

How the day unfolded

9 a.m.
Speaker of the House John Boehner meets with the House Republican Caucus in private. While there, he floats a new idea for addressing the debt crisis: not a short-term extension, as had been reported, but a "bicameral commission" that would work with Democrats to come up with a big-picture budget plan. That proposal would be linked to a bill that would ensure federal workers who weren't excepted from the shutdown get paid this week.

Around 10 a.m.
At a press conference with House Republican leaders, Boehner, Majority Leader Eric Cantor, and Majority Whip Kevin McCarthy make the case for negotiations.

Boehner calls for negotiations, arguing that debt ceiling increases have often been accompanied with such debate. (See The Wall Street Journal's analysis of this claim.)

Cantor calls for a delay of Obamacare's individual mandate — and then for negotiations.

McCarthy begins, "You're going to hear a similar tone from everyone up here" — and then calls for negotiations. 

Around 11 a.m.
President Obama calls Boehner. According to the White House:

[T]he President telephoned Speaker John Boehner from the Oval Office and repeated what he told him when they met at the White House last week: the President is willing to negotiate with Republicans — after the threat of government shutdown and default have been removed — over policies that Republicans think would strengthen the country.

Boehner spokesman Brendan Buck offered a slightly different take. "The president called the speaker again today to reiterate that he won't negotiate on a government funding bill or debt limit increase."

2:40 p.m.
Obama holds an extensive press conference. Among other things, he again rejects the Republicans' call for negotiations prior to raising the debt ceiling.

What has changed, or what seems to be motivating the idea that we have to have a new process, is Speaker Boehner — or at least some faction of the Republicans in the House and maybe some in the Senate — are holding out for a negotiation in theory, but in fact basically Democrats give a lot of concessions to Republicans, the Republicans don't give anything, and then that's dubbed as compromise.

He again demanded that negotiations happen absent the threat of debt default: "That's not how negotiations work. That's not how it happens in business. That's not how it happens in private life."

4:30 p.m.
Boehner hosts his own press conference to rebut the president's:

The long and short of it is there is going to be a negotiation here. … This isn't about me — and frankly, it's not about Republicans. This is about saving the future for our kids and our grandkids, and the only way this is going to happen is to in fact have a conversation. So it's time to have that conversation. Not next week, not next month. The conversation ought to start today.

4:50 p.m.
The White House issues formal notice that it will veto the "bicameral commission"/employee pay bill. "[T]he House should pass a clean debt ceiling bill without drama or delay," the notice read, "so that the United States can continue to pay its bills and fulfill the Nation's obligations."

Where the day ended

House Republicans adamantly oppose unilaterally extending the debt ceiling, proposing bilateral negotiations. Obama won't meet with Republicans until a debt ceiling extension is passed and the government is reopened with full sequestration-level funding.

Stay tuned for another exciting day of politics tomorrow. Two hundred sixteen hours to go.

Photo: The president and Boehner at their respective late-afternoon press conferences. (AP)