Dinesh D'Souza has resigned as president The King's College, the Manhattan Christian school announced on Thursday, even though D'Souza, writing to Fox News on Wednesday night, insisted that he did not cheat on his wife when he brought his new, young, blonde fiancee to a evangelical conference. 

The King's College board of trustees deliberated for hours and ultimately announced D'Souza resigned, according to The Daily Beast's David Sessions. They did not say whether it was because of a dissatisfaction with D'Souza's leadership over all or because of the scandal, first reported by Warren Smith in the evangelical magazine World.  In his note to Fox, D'Souza said that while he and his wife Dixie are not divorced (he filed papers starting divorce proceedings in California on Oct. 4), they had been separated for nearly two years when he met his companion Denise Joseph three months ago. (That timing would mean that they met after Joseph blogged her adoration for D'Souza as one of her "favorite conservative activist philosophers," as captured in the screenshot of her now deleted blog.)  Smith alleged that D'Souza, the filmmaker behind 2016: Obama's America, shared a hotel room with Joseph at an evangelical conferece last month and cited conference organizer Alex McFarland. False, D'Souza wrote:

I clearly told McFarland that Denise and I stayed in separate rooms. McFarland knew he didn’t have what he wanted, because he subsequently called me back and asked me again.  I realized McFarland may be fronting for Smith, so I told him I didn’t have any further comment.  I’m not sure whether McFarland is lying or Smith is lying, but one of them made up the quotation attributed to me that we stayed in the same room but “nothing happened.”  This is pure libel.

It was public knowledge that he'd been separated for two years, D'Souza claims. He told Smith that, but Smith deliberately left it out. Why? Because apparently World editor Marvin Olasky still holds a grudge against D'Souza for not being evangelical enough for King's College, as Amy Sullivan at The New Republic reported. "I had no idea that it is considered wrong in Christian circles to be engaged prior to being divorced, even though in a state of separation and in divorce proceedings," D'Souza writes. 

Now, the whirlwind engagement is over. D'Souza and Joseph decided to suspend the engagement in light of all the controversy. But the bigger problem with this ordeal is that this is not how proper Christians behave. Smith, McFarland, and Olasky can go to hell: "This is viciousness masquerading as righteousness.  And this is the behavior that is truly worthy of Christian condemnation."

Photo by Steve Jozefcyk via Flickr