All these political reporters have been complaining about the boring staged political conventions for weeks, but when presented with the opportunity to talk to a real live victim of the "Obama economy" -- a hooker -- they run away screaming. The National Review's John Fund explains that one of their political reporters was forced to request a hotel change after the Democratic National Convention assigned the reporter to a seedy Charlotte hotel that might have had a hooker working in the parking lot. Fund quotes his colleague anonymously:

The Knights Inn was the worst hotel I have ever seen, and I’ve stayed in many bad motels in my life. Two guys were dealing drugs in the room next to me, and a prostitute was working out of the parking lot. And this was in the early afternoon. The room itself was dirty, full of other people’s stuff, etc.

I have never requested a hotel change in 3 years at NR. This was the first time I felt absolutely compelled.

Staffers from Politico and The Hill also fled their hotels, and The Daily Caller's Tucker Carlson -- who once bragged about being so tough he shoved a dude who hit on him in a bathroom -- complained his staff is stuck in "the worst hotel you can imagine."

It's not that anyone wants to hang out in a hooker hotel on a family vacation. But this is not a family vacation. "The conventions are the most expensive and misguided use of journalistic resources outside of the Newseum," Politico's Glenn Thrush tweeted Tuesday. All these reporters rounded up in one place with no real stories to write about. And boom -- the National Review is presented with the perfect opportunity to talk to a woman living in a swing state who clearly hasn't been able to make ends meet in the non-underground economy. What do they do? Flee to South Carolina. The Knights Inn hooker would make a perfect Republican campaign prop, if her job weren't so icky. You'd think reporters, whose job allegedly requires they write about real humans, would have a stronger constitution.