Politico's Lois Romano wrote today that the 2012 presidential election has become a "battle for white men," because, "after decades of taking a back seat" to women and minorty voter. Now, exactly when were white guys being so ignored? Now, it's true, that Mitt Romney is honing in on white guys with the endorsement of Mike Rowe, who as the current king of dude TV hosts of Dirty Jobs, narrates Deadliest Catch, and is the face of Ford pick-up trucks. But if you've been a sentient being during more than one presidential elections in recent "decades," you might remember some white guys playing a role. Browse the wire services' photo archives and you'll discover the battle for white men has never stopped. Indeed, you might say that every election has been a battle for white men. Including this election, because Politico's Alexander Burns reported on April 19 that the real fight between Mitt Romney and President Obama would be over "upscale and blue-collar white voters." 

Every four years -- well, every year, really -- politicians surround themselves with white male faces while they engage in whatever white male activities have been deemed the hottest embodiments of earthy authenticity by East Coast people. (This year, Obama's all over the microbrews.) I searched  for evidence of presidential candidates indulging women in a similar fashion, yet have been unable to uncover any photos of, say, President Obama shopping at J.C. Penny's on the weekend while a crowd of women shoppers looks on. Behold, the front lines of the Battle for White Men, the Hundreds and Hundreds Years War of our time.

There is no doubt the candidates are looking to appeal to white guys right now. Here's Obama drinking at the Iowa State Fair August 14, like a dude.

(Photo via Reuters.)

Here's Obama dude-ing it up again last St. Patrick's Day in Washington.

(Photo via Reuters.)

Romney doesn't drink, so he tends to find white guys while they work or eat. Here he is meeting with Ohio coal miners August 14.

(Photo via Reuters.)

Romney just so happened to sit down next to the textbook crusty old white guy when he campaigned in Manchester, New Hampshire in December 2011.

(Photo via Reuters.)

He's been at it for a long time. Here he is back in December 2007, fighting for white guy votes in a cafe in Nashua, New Hampshire.

(Photo via Reuters.)

Wait! And here was Obama, long before the alleged white guy battle royale began, hanging out with all these white guys doing white guy things in North Carolina in June 2008.

(Photo via Reuters.)

But it's not just Romney and Obama. Here's John Kerry in October 2004, getting just about as white guy as you can get.

And here, back when real pundits cited real polls about which candidate voters would rather have a beer with, he is broing down in Wisconsin:

(Photos via Reuters.)

George W. Bush studiously cultivated white men in 2004. He ate carbs like a white male.

(Photo via Reuters.)

He fulfilled white male dreams like a white male.

(Photo via Reuters.)

But Bush didn't just coast on that white guy cred in his second term. Here he eats barbecue in Chattanooga, Tennessee, in 2007 with a buffet of white guys.

(Photo via Reuters.)

Even as a candidate, in February 2000, Bush wore white socks stretched all the way up his calves in solidarity with white males in South Carolina.

(Photo via Associated Press.)

Naturally, Al Gore served white male snacks at the Iowa State Fair in 1999.

(Photo via Associated Press.)

And manly white male ribs in Minneapolis the same year.

(Photo via Associated Press.)

Bill Clinton, super white guy, with white guys in 1996.

Clinton's win came thanks to support from the stars of the 1994 midterm elections -- you guessed it, "angry white men."

We could go on and on. But let's just cut back in history. Here is President William Taft kicking off his re-election bid in 1912. He was worried about the white male vote. So was Woodrow Wilson, who would beat him. They were fighting for the white male vote because at the time, that was pretty much the only people who were allowed to vote.