"Is this the most boring election ever?" Matt Taibbi asks in Rolling Stone Tuesday. He's not the first to ask that question. Begging for the next six months to pass speedily, Jim Newell wrote for The Guardian Monday, "You think election coverage is trivial now? Some time in the future I'll have to introduce you to my friend August, the traditional month of total unraveling and complete devolution." This election is "going to be dull," Peter Beinart argued for The Daily Beast last week, though he said boring isn't so bad. 

You know what, guys? You're not the only ones who are bored. So is Mitt Romney, who reportedly is not all that interested in hearing folksy stories from average voters or eating fattening things like pizza. But Romney has it worse than these writers, because he is taped all day every day. That means he can't help letting a bit of his boredom show up on his face.

The banal symbolic tasks some politicians enjoy provide no such excitement for Romney. Here he is Monday at the NBA playoffs, examining a souvenir towel as part of the "Politician Loves Sports Just Like a Regular Guy" ritual:

During the "Old Foes Join Forces" ritual May 3 with Michiele Bachmann, Romney's face says, "I can't believe I have to have anything to do with this person."

At a campaign rally in Virginia May 2, Romney's face was not one of someone invigorated by the crowd:

On April 27, Romney engaged in the "Politician Snacks Casually with College Kids to Remind Us That He Was Once Young" ritual. His face says, "thank God I can eat during this thing so I don't have to fake a full-teeth smile."

At a speech at Otterbein University the same day, Romney's lack of enthusiasm was infectious:

During the "Politician Expresses Love of Babies" ritual April 1, Romney looked like he was trying to think up some good baby compliments. (Tip: When in doubt, Aunt June says, just say, "Now that's a baby!"):

In March, Romney nearly balked right in the middle of the "Politician Kisses Grandma" ceremony:

Feigning interest during the "Folks Chat During Breakfast" ritual in Illinois in March:

(Above photos via Reuters.)

And in Lansing, Michigan, Tuesday, saying one more time that he "believes in America" for the millionth time, knowing the ritual will be repeated a million times more over the next six months.