Rick Santorum isn't having a great day, from an embarrassing typo to a retracted endorsement and admitting he didn't do all that well on Super Tuesday.

Worse than seeing the candidate's "PUBIC SCHEDULE" widely mocked on Twitter was the announcement that the governor of Alabama would be endorsing Santorum, only to have the governor himself say that wasn't quite true on Facebook. This comes hours before the Alabama and Mississippi vote tallies come in, which are not expected to help him much.

Can this day get any worse? A rundown:

Pubic schedule. Slate's Dave Weigel tweets this photo:

Alabama governor says "jk." Santorum's campaign announced Gov. Robert Bently endorsed Santorum Tuesday.  But as Politico's Alexander Burns points out, Bently never said that out right. Bently then updated on his Facebook page to say that while he voted for Santorum, he's not endorsing him. "I have chosen not to publicly endorse a candidate." the governor writes. "I believe a vote is a personal decision that should be based on a voter’s values and principles, not on someone else’s opinion. After being asked who I would vote for, I responded that I had personally chosen to vote for Rick Santorum. The Republican primary features a strong pool of candidates, and I will fully support the Republican nominee chosen by the people."

Gingrich says he and Santorum are a "tag team" to sink Romney. Newt is not helping Santorum make the case that he's only in the race for the good of the party. Gingrich told the hosts of "The Rick & Bubba Show" Tuesday that he and Santorum might not be able to win the Republican primary, but they can at least lose it for Romney. "There's a certain advantage, I think right now, in having both of us tag-team Romney because neither one of us by ourselves can raise the money to match Romney," Gingrich said, according to the Los Angeles Times' John Hoeffel. "With Rick and me together, we're really slowing him down with some help frankly from Ron Paul."

Meanwhile, Santorum admitted Tuesday that he couldn't get the majority of delegates, either. "I think you've been listening to math class and delegate math class instead of looking at the reality of the situation," Santorum said. "The reality of the situation is that it's going to be very difficult for anyone to get to the number of delegates that is necessary to win with the majority at the convention."

Santorum admits Super Tuesday wasn't so great for him. In trying to play down expectations that the "conservative alternative" would win in the most conservative states, Santorum came up with an interesting excuse: We’re going into Newt’s backyard and obviously Gov. Romney’s coming off a big Super Tuesday. We’ve got to come in here and do well, and I think from all the polls we’re doing very well." But Santorum's campaign had argued that Super Tuesday was a great day for him.

Santorum spokesman offers odd logic in playing down the Tuesday's vote. On Fox News Tuesday morning, Hogan Gidley said, Mississippi and Alabama shouldn't matter too much, because "Gingrich basically said he had to win these two states, and that was the southern strategy he had...  If he doesn't run away with it, he might have an issue. And of course, Mitt Romney obviously doesn't play well in the South. He might squeak out a win in one of these states, but the bottom line is: he's still outspending everybody." As The Hill's Christian Heinze points out, "If Romney doesn't play well in the South but beats Santorum there, what does that say about Rick?"

All we can say is, hang in there!