Mitt Romney's campaign has started a new blog to humanize him, but he still has some work to do in Virginia. Newt Gingrich has that genre locked down, but he might consider working on another: cute Callista photos. Here's our guide to today's polls and why they matter.

Findings: Obama's ahead of Romney in Virginia with 50 percent to 42 percent. If Romney adds the state's governor, Bob McDonnell, to the ticket, the outcome is essentially the same: 50 prcent to 43 percent.
Pollster: Quinnipiac
Methodology: Survey of 1,034 registered voters from March 13 to March 18.
Why it matters: Virginia was a surprise swing state in 2008, and Obama's reelection campaign thinks winning the state plus North Carolina is a sure path to 270 electoral votes in November. McDonnell has high approval ratings, the pollster notes, but his addition to the ticket doesn't change Virginians' minds.
Caveat: Romney is still fighting fellow Republicans in the primary and has not focused all his energies on attacking Obama.
 
Findings: Callista Gingrich is the only potential first lady who is more disliked than liked. Her favorability rating is 18 percent, her unfavorability rating is 44 percent. Michelle Obama is the only woman who comes close, with a 34 percent unfavoribility rating but a 54 percent favorability rating.
Methodology: Robo-calls to 900 American voters from March 15 to March 17. 
Why it matters: The American people have shockingly refused to accept the bulletproof defense of Callista offered by the Atlantic Wire: that her steadfast devotion to her unusual haircut, even in the face of whithering criticism, shows she's a rebel, bravely defying the bed-headed hordes, and standing up for her haircare principles. Instead, Americans are sticking with the worn-out tradition of rooting against the villans of country music songs.
Caveat: PPP leans left.
 
Findings: Santorum is ahead in the Louisiana primary, with 37 percent to Romney's 24 percent. Gingrich has 21 percent. 
Methodology: Survey of 2,018 likely voters on March 19.
Why it matters: Louisiana votes March 24. Gingrich's southern strategy is still failing -- he lost in Alabama and Mississippi -- and his campaign has again entered the anonymous griping stage. Politico reports that that he makes "99.9 percent" of campaign decisions, which sometimes leads to chaos. The decision to conceded Kansas was apparently made spur-of-the-moment. And, just as his former House colleagues complain, he can't stick to one issue at a time. "One day, it’s the most current of issues, gas prices, and the next he’s back to moon bases and brain science," Politico says.
Caveat: Magellan is a Republican firm.