With his loss in last night's Ohio primary, Dennis Kucinich faces the end of his congressional career. But that doesn't mean he has to fade from cultural relevance. At 65, the UFO-spotting icon of the antiwar left, who famously filed articles of impeachment against Vice President Dick Cheney, still has a lot of life in him. Here's what we recommend for the currently down-on-his-luck congressman: 

Form a Band with Willie Nelson

With his surprisingly silky vocals (listen to him sing Merle Travis' "Sixteen Tons"), support for marijuana legalization and close-knit relationship with country legend and weed advocate Willie Nelson, it's not hard to imagine a nationwide tour with Kucinich on backup vocals. It could be good for Willie too, forcing him to branch out to different genres given Kucinich's affection for heavy metal.

Run for Election in Washington State

A less exciting but certainly practical option: Kucinich could run for Congress in another district. According to The Washington Posthe's made vague statements about pulling a carpetbagger move in Washington state to run in a deep blue district there. To be sure, it looks like a long-shot at this point. "He would need to establish residency there by mid-April, but it’s not certain he could do that while remaining in Congress representing an Ohio district," notes the newspaper. It appears he would have to resign his current post early to make the move. 

Stump for Ron Paul 

He's got some time on his hands, why not lend a hand to fellow peace-loving candidate who needs a jump-start? During his long-shot presidential bid in 2007, Kucinich even picked the libertarian as his running mate. To be sure, they have stark differences on domestic policy but they united on non-interventionism, opposed the Iraq invasion, and wanted to end international trade deals like NAFTA.  

Human Rights Campaign Spokesman 

vocal supporter of same-sex marriage who wants to rid the clause "between a man and a woman" from the definition of marriage, Kucinich has also voted for expanded hate crimes legislation and opposed a ban on LGBT adoption in Washington, D.C. He's also pretty comfortable putting his face to the cause:

 

 

TV Commentator

The man is an electric presence on cable television, which partially explains his rise to national prominence. As the Post notes, the "polarization of cable TV news... elevated his national profile as an uncompromising voice on the left." He'd obviously fit in nicely at MSNBC but at Fox News as well, given the network's penchant for setting up fights with far-left stalwarts. Watch him tussle it out with Bill O'Reilly. Get this man a contributor contract!