Everyone has an opinion about Bradley Manning: the man who may or may not have enabled WikiLeaks to unleash a torrent of secret U.S. diplomatic cables. The whistleblower's actions—which have been hailed as heroic and decried as terroristic—have prompted at least one ex-governor to call for the perpetrator's execution. In a recent stop on his book tour promoting his Can't Wait Until Christmas! title, Huckabee bluntly asserted that the actions of the whistleblower—whoever it turns out to be—constitutes an act of treason.

"Whoever in our government leaked that information is guilty of treason and I think anything less of execution is too kind a penalty," stated Huckabee matter-of-factly, saying that person has "blood" on their hands and would be "personally responsible" for any lives they put in danger. His sentiment echoes that of Sarah Palin, who labeled the document deluge a "treasonous act" that the U.S. needed to use "all necessary means" to defeat.

Huckabee pivoted from the whistleblower to point a finger at another 'villain' in the latest WikiLeaks episode: The New York Times. In publishing the findings, the ex-governor argued that the paper showed a "utter, reckless disregard for any responsible journalism by printing something that they know they obtained in a way that is not appropriate."