During an appearance on Fox Business Monday night, outgoing New Hampshire Senator Judd Gregg mentioned that he thought repealing the health care law would be the wrong tack for Republicans to take. "I don't think starving or repeal is probably the best approach here," said Gregg. "You basically go in and restructure it." The GOP has taken a hard line against the health care law, so it's notable that Gregg, the ranking Republican on the Senate Budget Committee, is advising against blocking or nullifying the legislation entirely. How have his words been received?

  • Gregg: Here's What GOP Should Do Instead  Gregg offered his thoughts on working with the existing legislation.

We should take the money that was in the Medicare system, that was being saved in the Medicare system, and use it to shore up the Medicare system, which we know is going insolvent. And then we should re-address this issue of an uninsured, so that we don't end up with a massive new program which we can't afford, but rather set up a program recognizing that there are different demographic groups in the uninsured, and they can be taken care of in different ways ... And lastly and most importantly, we have to change the way the health care is delivered in this country. We have to reward people for doing good, quality health care at lower costs, and stop rewarding people for just doing repetitious things that get you a lot of money and create a lot of fraud.

  • Gregg Not the Only One to Break Ranks, notes Kate Pickert at Time, pointing to a recent interview with Republican Representative Paul Ryan in which Ryan expressed some doubts about whether a push to starve the bill of funds could make it past the president. Pickert adds that one of the tenets of the Republicans' Pledge to America--"we will immediately take action to repeal this law"--looks to be in jeopardy. "Take action, maybe," Pickert writes. "But actually repeal the Affordable Care Act, not anytime soon."

  • This Is Why the Tea Party Exists, writes Jimmie Bise at The Sundries Shack. "This sort of mealy-mouth backtracking [from Gregg], without much of a reason or good sense behind it, is what keeps the Tea Party on edge; and, ultimately, it's why the American people can't trust the Republican Party as far as they can throw its nearest elected official," says Bise. "The sooner the GOP realizes that we're done with that way of doing business with our money and our lives, the better off the party will be."