This week, news broke that Justice Clarence Thomas's wife had reopened a decades-old wound by calling Anita Hill, Thomas's former aide who testified at his confirmation hearing that he had sexually harassed her. Ginni Thomas requested an apology from Hill in a voice message.

That probably won't be coming: The Washington Post reports today that Lillian McEwan, with whom Thomas was in a relationship at the time, is now, finally, supporting Hill's story. Apparently she didn't see fit to say anything during the hearings, but now admits Thomas often told her about women at work, and on at least one occasion asked one of these women her bra size. Thus, as the Post's Michael Fletcher puts it, "Hill's allegations that Thomas had pressed her for dates and made lurid sexual references rang familiar." For commentators, this Friday just got a lot more interesting.
  • Nice Work, Mrs. Thomas  "I suspect this isn't exactly the story Ginni Thomas was looking for," remarks Joe Sudbay at Americablog.
  • Timing  Law professor Ann Althouse homes in on what she calls the "key sentence" in the Post story about McEwen: "She has written a memoir, which she is now shopping to publishers."
  • So Basically We Have a Perjurer as a Sitting Supreme Court Justice  "Bill Clinton was impeached for lying about a blowjob," writes Jim White at liberal Firedoglake, "but Clarence Thomas lied about a repeated pattern of objectification of women and he continues to serve on the Supreme Court in good standing and even has fans calling on him to run for President.If Clarence Thomas had an ounce of integrity about him," he adds, "he would resign ... Of course, there is zero chance of that happening."
  • What to Do  "Clarence Thomas is probably looking for someone to blame over all of this," writes New York Magazine's Nitasha Tiku.

But should it be the ex-lover who waited nineteen years to make these disclosures, despite repeated requests to share her side of the story? Or should he blame theliberal media for calling out his wife's tea-party railings against unidentified enemies of the Constitution, which then practically forced her to call Anita Hill, driving up interest in McEwen's memoir?

Thomas could even take aim at Joe Biden, who headed the Senate Judiciary Committee and limited witnesses during the sexual-harassment hearings to women who had a "professional relationship" with Thomas. ... After carefully weighing all the potential defendants, we think Clarence Thomas should blame ... himself.