Calls for Governor David Paterson's resignation are increasing following a fourth New York Times article criticizing him and his administration. The latest bombshell suggests Paterson personally ordered aides to silence a victim of domestic violence. As the case against Paterson builds, the state's Democratic chairman Jay Jacobs is headed to Albany to have a "realistic" chat with him. But not everybody's calling for the guillotine just yet. Here's what pundits, politicians, and activists are saying on the matter:

  • Paterson Must Resign Now, writes Marcia Pappas, president of the National Organization for Women's New York branch: "It is inappropriate for the governor to have any contact or to direct anyone to contact an alleged victim of violence. This latest news is very disappointing for those of us who believed the governor was a strong advocate for women's equality and for ending violence against women ... It is now time for the governor to step down."
  • Too Soon To Say, says New York Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver: "I do not feel he should resign. The investigation is pending, no discussions should be had until such time."
  • New Yorkers Want Him to Finish, notes The Atlantic's Chris Good, citing a new Marist poll: "Of 543 registered voters (margin of error +/-4.5%), 66% say Paterson should finish out his term, 28% say he should resign, and 6% are unsure."
  • Paterson Chose This Path, writes Juli Weiner at Vanity Fair, abstaining from the resignation question: "As this mess no doubt gets even more sordid and contemptible, it is important to keep in mind that Paterson actually chose to do all this instead of just deal with the day or two of bad publicity that would come from a widely criticized Times piece about his aide. He runs his cover-ups like he runs the state, ho ho ho!"
  • Worse Than Spitzer, Worse Than Blago, writes Michael Stickings at The Reaction: "Actually, it looks like Paterson is approaching Blagojevich territory, if he's not there already ... The buying and selling of political office is bad, very bad, but the subversion of the justice system and the use of one's office to influence a domestic abuse case? That takes misconduct to a whole new level."