It's too early to estimate the full impact of President Obama's health care summit. But for the intrepid bloggers who attempted to provide breaking analysis of the debate, the challenge was one of endurance (witness the Wire's updates on the liveblogging horde). The summit ran 90 minutes long and was replete with obscure policy references and long-winded partisan rhetoric.

One pundit stood tall among the masses of the Twitterverse: Ezra Klein. The liberal Washington Post blogger provided insightful, comprehensive coverage of the summit, mixing in policy corrections with witty barbs on everything from John Boehner's tan to bathroom breaks. Klein stood out for his consistency, providing substantive up-to-the-minute analysis of every major point of debate.

Republican Obstructionism

Fascinated by the Republican message that American government can't do comprehensive reform of problems. Do-nothing has become an ideology.
Insurance Competition Across State Lines
The exchanges offer much, much more direct competition between insurers than letting insurers sell across state lines. It's not even close.
The Deficit Question
Oh, c'mon @RepPaulRyan, Medicaid is growing at 21%this year because this is the worst recession since the 30s. That's not playing straight.

[John] Boehner appears to think that a deficit-reducing bill will bankrupt our country. That's some creative budgeting.
John Barrasso and 'Catastrophic Coverage'
If all doctors took care of everyone regardless of ability to pay, then no one would buy insurance. Barrasso can't believe what he's saying.

There's a difference between "we have the best health-care system in the world" and "I can buy the best health care in the world."

Boy, it was a catastrophe putting Barrasso in charge of the Republican's coverage presentation.
The GOP's Polling Hypocrisy
If polls are so important to the Republicans, why aren't they for the public option?

Remember when Republicans went to great lengths to mock politicians who listen to the polls? http://bit.ly/d60zZf
The Partisan Battle
No one in the room has an open mind. No one in America is watching. The real audience is the media who is watching and might be convinced.

Obama: 'John [McCain], we're not campaigning anymore. The election is over.' This is why we need the "OH, SNAP!" guy!

I'm pretty sure this is the last of these that Republicans are going to do with Obama. Being president is a helluva home field advantage.