From her "stroke of genius" resignation" to her Hong Kong economics lecture to her quip-friendly memoir, Sarah Palin has an uncanny gift for staying in the spotlight. Now word comes that the former ex-Alaska governor is forming a new political group, "Stand Up for Our Nation" just days after Liz Cheney launched her own group focused on national security issues. Pundits are pondering the curious timing of announcement. What does Sarah Palin have up her sleeve this time?

  • She Must Be Running For President "SarahPAC wasn't enough?" At Hot Air, Allahpundit can't see any other reason to form a second political group. "Would someone set up two political action groups if they weren't thinking seriously about running for president?" he asks. Allahpundit thinks Palin's organization will be the "domestic policy equivalent" of Liz Cheney's group. But he's sorry the two women didn't combine forces. "How come she didn't end up partnering with Liz Cheney on Keep America Safe, anyway? It would have been an amazing force multiplier among the grassroots to see their two favorite hawkish women on the same team."
  • Nothing to See Here Dan Riehl at Riehl World View says a political group is simply a good way to fund Palin's travel expenses. "While interesting it isn't exactly unheard of either. I would imagine this would be a way for her to travel and such without donations being related to a campaign."
  • Growing Support From the GOP? At The Atlantic, Chris Good wonders if McCain campaign manager Steve Schmidt is flip-flopping on Palin. "Despite having predicted Palin would be a 'catastrophic' nominee for the GOP in 2012, former McCain campaign manager Steve Schmidt defended the decision to pick her as VP nominee today..."
  • Why Won't She Go Quietly? At The New York Post, Cindy Adams says Palin's antics have only just begun. "Exactly what it's standing for is unclear. If not a chicken in every pot, maybe a heater in every igloo. A monogrammed puck for every hockey mom. Possibly, it'll start, 'Give me your poor, your tired governors . . .'"