President Obama's unprecedented blitz of Sunday talk shows this weekend revived a hoary question: Is Obama overexposed? This cliché has been around longer than most, with hang-wringing about whether Obama had stuck himself out too far dating back to the initial weeks of his presidency.

Pundits split on the answer. Attempts to debunk the "overexposed" meme are so common that they, too, verge on becoming cliché (stay tuned). , But the commentariat is rarely dissuaded by such concerns and has launched another fussilade in the neverending campaign:

  • "Obama Overload: Is the President Overexposed?" Jake Tapper, ABC, 9/21/09
  • "Is Obama Overexposed?" Drew Westen, CNN, 9/21/09
  • "Obama Overexposed?" James Joyner, Outside the Beltway, 9/21/09
  • "Media Overexposes 'Obama Is Overexposed' Complaint," Leslie Savan, The Nation, 9/19/09
  • "Is Obama Over-Exposed?" Taegan Goddard, CQ Politics, 9/16/09
  • "Will Barack Obama's Media Ubiquity Be the Most Significant Aspect of His Presidency?" Jennifor Senior, New York Magazine, 8/2/09
  • "Could Obama Become the Lindsay Lohan of Presidents?" Kerry Golds, The Atlantic, 7/23/09
  • "Obamathon: Is the President Overexposed?" James Poniewozik, Time 3/26/09
  • "Obama 'Overexposed': The Media's New New Obsession," Jason Linkins, The Huffington Post 3/24/09
  • "Obama, Overexposed." George Will, Townhall, 3/12/09
Robert A. George of the New York Post explains on his blog that the meme will only die when Obama's media tactics no longer work:
In short, your best salesman is only overexposed when 1) customers are no longer interested in buying what he's selling, or 2) don't believe his pitch. The White House has determined that Barack Obama hasn't reached that point yet.