As I shove the last of a sad sandwich, a sadwich if you will, into my mouth in front of my laptop, I am comforted by the fact that most Americans spend their lunches the exact same way. In a study by The NPD Group, they determined that more than half of Americans eat alone. 

Source: The NPD Group/National Eating Trends®

You're more likely to eat alone for breakfast than for lunch, as 60 percent of Americans spend the most important meal of the day munching on their own. For lunch, its 55 percent loners. Luckily, most people have dinner companions: only 32 percent of people eat supper by themselves, then again, 27 percent of households are one person. 

"The number of solo eating and beverage occasions have wide-ranging implications for food and beverage marketers in terms of new products, packaging, and positioning," Darren Seifer, NPD food and beverage industry analyst, said  in a statement. "As lifestyles shift it’s key for marketers to profile and segment occasions when their product is consumed in various ways, including solo versus social occasions, in order to connect most effectively with consumers."

Does anyone want to have dinner with me? I could go for some mozzarella sticks.