John Miller, last seen on 60 Minutes tossing the NSA a bunch of softball questions about what its does and why that should be okay with all of us, is leaving journalism to work for the NYPD again.

This comes as no surprise; rumors that Miller would leave CBS to work for incoming police commissioner William Bratton -- who Miller has worked for in the past -- began even before Miller's much-derided NSA report, and picked up momentum in its aftermath. (I'm not sure why both the AP and Mediabistro said the reports began after Miller's interview aired. Christopher Dickey's Daily Beast article, published the Wednesday before, said Bratton was expected to appoint Miller "to revamp the NYPD intelligence division.")

Miller finally confirmed the move on CBS' New York affiliate, but would not specify what his new role will actually be. WCBS said it would have something to do with the NYPD's counter-terrorism division. CBS, which Miller joined in 2011, said he would be welcome back any time.

Last week, Miller spoke to New York Times' David Carr to defend his NSA report. Carr wrote:

He is nothing if not confident, dismissing his critics as ankle-biting, agenda-ridden bloggers who could not be compelled to get out of their pajamas and do actual reporting.

'I fully reject the criticism from you and others,' he told me. 'The N.S.A. story has been a fairly one-way dialogue. There has been no conversation and when you do hear from the N.S.A., it is in a terse, highly vetted statement.'

'We went there, we asked every question we wanted to, listened to the answers, followed up as we wished, and our audience can decide what and who they believe. As we constructed it, the N.S.A. was a story about a debate, not a villain, and we added to that debate with important information. I fail to understand how a shrill argument for the sake of creating televised drama would have accomplished anything.'