One of the various bills California Governor Jerry Brown signed into law on Tuesday made posting revenge porn online a misdemeanor crime. Posting revenge porn—when a jilted lover posts a former partner's indecent photos online—is now punishable in the state by up to six months in jail and a $1,000 fine.

The author of Senate Bill 255, state senator Anthony Canella, said in a press release that "Until now, there was no tool for law enforcement to protect victims ... Too many have had their lives upended because of an action of another that they trusted." The lack of effective legal recourse for revenge porn has been a rising issue over the last few years.

The new law will most likely be contentious. While California joins New Jersey, which currently classifies the act as a felony, other states such as Florida and Missouri and organizations like the ACLU have argued that such laws violate the First Amendment and inhibit free speech.

In addition to the state's new revenge porn law, Brown also signed SB 568 into law, which requires websites to provide a way for minors to delete their data from the service. Uncertainty, however, could arise over what sites are covered by the bill. Counsel for the Center for Democracy & Technology told The Los Angeles Times that, "If the sites are unclear whether they are covered under the scope of the bill, the response could be to bar minors from the sites entirely."