Lawyers overseeing the money donated to the victims of the Sandy Hook Elementary shooting have come up with a plan to disperse the funds, but some are arguing that not enough money is actually going to the victims' families. According to the plan that's been drawn up, the surviving families of the 20 children and six adults who were killed at the school last December will each receive $281,000. Twelve children who witnessed the attack and survived will get $20,000 each, and the two teachers who were wounded will get $75,000 each.

That covers about $7.7 million of the $11.4 million that was raised through the United Way charities. So like many people, you're probably asking, "What about the rest of it?" The remaining $3.7 million is being set aside for "long-term assistance in the community," a decision that has angered some residents who feel more of the the money, if not all, should go directly to the victims' families.

The Governor of Connecticut, Dan Malloy, has even asked that the foundation created to oversee the money step aside and let someone else handle it. He sent a letter to the board of the "Newtown-Sandy Hook Community Foundation" last week, saying he is "frustrated" by their slow progress, and that "your choice to rely primarily on community members to make these decisions has unintentionally made the process more difficult."

Malloy, like many others, is also upset that the families of those killed will not be able to apply for the remainder of the money (or any new money that comes in), and are not eligible for payments made directly from the community fund. (Although they may benefit indirectly from some programs.)

The Foundation defended its plan, however, saying it was never meant to be a victim's compensation fund and the other students, teachers, and first responders continue to be affected by the shooting too.