Fannie Mae, the government-funded mortgage lender, had some surprising news earlier today. During 2012, for the first time in four years, it didn't require any funding from the Treasury Department. And, better yet, it contributed $7.6 billion back into the government's pocketbook. Which inspired us to check in on the government's other semi-willing recession-era investments.

The news about Fannie Mae is undeniably good. The Times' Dealbook blog explains the significance:

The huge profits rolling in at Fannie, and at its corporate sibling Freddie Mac, reflect the enormous role the government is playing in the housing market nearly five years after the crisis. As a result, the earnings will intensify the debate over the role that government should play in supporting housing. …

Fannie and Freddie charge fees in return for a guarantee that they will pay back mortgages that default. In the first years after the crisis, that fee revenue was overwhelmed by losses. As those have abated, profits have returned for the two mortgage giants.

According to the agency's full press release, here's how its "draws from Treasury" (took) and "dividend payments to Treasury" (paid) compare.

Clearly the trend is good. But it will take a while to make up for that giant red spike. The entire amount repaid since 2009 amounts to only about half of what was borrowed that year. Or, to put it another way, here's the ratio of what has been borrowed to what has been repaid.

Thirty-one billion down, 85 billion to go.

We can do a similar calculation for the other elements of the government bailout — or, at least, those items included in the Troubled Asset Relief Program, or TARP. At its creation, the government assigned a special inspector general to review TARP investments and compile quarterly reports on the process. The most recent report came out in January, and suggests that the government is doing much better with TARP than with Fannie Mae.

The most important chart is this one. Of the $418 billion TARP has loaned out (or, in some cases, gave), $344.8 has been repaid. (The actual outstanding amount is about $67.3 billion, due to rounding errors.) Over 83 percent of the money has been repaid.

The Inspector General's report breaks TARP down into ten programs. Here's how each has fared, with SIGTARP's descriptions of each beneath. Full descriptions start on page 43 here. (We've included the Fannie Mae figures and the TARP total in this first graph.)

Housing support programs

Description: Modification of mortgage loans

Status: Open

Amount loaned: $6.4 billion

Amount repaid: $0 billion (This program does not require repayment.)

Capital purchase program

Description: Investments in 707 banks

Status: Closed

Amount loaned: $204.9 billion

Amount repaid: $194.3 billion

Percent repaid: 94.83 percent

Community development capital initiative

Description: Investments in Community Development Financial Institutions (“CDFIs”)

Status: Closed

Amount loaned: $0.2 billion

Amount repaid: $0 billion

Percent repaid: 0 percent

Systemically significant failing institutions

Description: AIG investment

Status: Closed

Amount loaned: $67.8 billion

Amount repaid: $54.4 billion

Percent repaid: 80.24 percent

Targeted investment program

Description: Citigroup, Bank of America investments

Status: Closed

Amount loaned: $40 billion

Amount repaid: $40 billion

Percent repaid: 100 percent

Asset guarantee program

Description: Citigroup, ring-fence asset guarantee

Status: Closed

Amount loaned: $0 billion

Amount repaid: $0 billion

Percent repaid: 0 percent

Term asset-backed securities loan facility

Description: FRBNY non-recourse loans for purchase of asset-backed securities

Status: Open

Amount loaned: $0.1 billion

Amount repaid: $0 billion

Percent repaid: 0 percent

Public-private investment program

Description: Investments in legacy mortgage-backed securities using private and Government equity, along with Government debt

Status: Open

Amount loaned: $18.6 billion

Amount repaid: $15 billion

Percent repaid: 80.65 percent

Unlocking credit for small businesses

Description: Purchase of securities backed by sba loans

Status: Closed

Amount loaned: $0.4 billion

Amount repaid: $0.4 billion

Percent repaid: 100 percent

Automotive industry support programs

Description: GM, Chrysler, ally Financial inc. (formerly GMaC), Chrysler Financial; received $34.2 billion in loan repayments, preferred stock redemptions and proceeds from the sale of common stock; terminated Chrysler’s $2.1 billion in undrawn loan commitments

Status: Closed

Amount loaned: $79.7 billion

Amount repaid: $40.7 billion

Percent repaid: 51.07 percent

To this last point, you may be curious: How have individual automakers fared? Chrysler is out of TARP. GM still owes taxpayers $21.6 billion. Or, in our ongoing efforts to make such numbers accessible — enough to buy 1.26 million Chevy Cruzes.