Things are going particularly well for the MTA: the subway is about 80 percent restored and more lines are opening up by the hour. There are trains travelling from Brooklyn to Manhattan again. The 4, 5, 6 and 7 trains resumed operation in some capacity on Saturday. More trains are opening as the day goes on, too. The R, Q, 2 and 3 trains should be back in a limited capacity by the time you wake up Sunday morning. Fares aren't free anymore, but at least you can get around again. The MTA is getting a lot of praise on Twitter for how quickly they've been able to restore some of the lines.

That doesn't mean there isn't work to be done, though. Sorry, Williamsburg, but the L train is still totally flooded "from wall to wall and floor to ceiling." The G train is still pretty flooded too. "I'm particularly worried about" the L, MTA chairman Joe Lhota told the Wall Street Journal, "because of how long it is." The MTA gave us a small glimpse into the process of draining the lines with a photoset of workers draining one of the flooded lines last night. 

This is a "pump train," which seems pretty self-explanatory. It's the train the pump travels on. 

From inside the line the A and C trains travel on known as the "Cranberry Tube." Doesn't look like there's very much water, right?

This guy wants to know how much there is, too. 

You can't really see it here, but that ruler shows there's 28 inches of water in the Cranberry Tube. For those keeping score at home, that's over two feet of water. 

We're trying to decide if the Dasani water bottle in the bottom left corner is the worst product placement of all time or an unfortunate coincidence. 

This is a pump train in action, pumping the water into its siphoning tube. It's like a really big, really complicated shop vac. 

This is the latest map the MTA offered of the reopened subway lines.