Now that The New York Times pay wall is live, you only get 10 free clicks a month. For those worried about hitting their limit, we're taking a look through the paper each morning to find the stories that can make your clicks count.

Top Stories: As Cuba slowly gets a free market and small private businesses emerge, "new economic bonds between Cuba and the United States have formed, creating new challenges, new possibilities — and a more complicated debate over the embargo."

World: The Palestinian Authority "is rapidly losing credibility, even relevance" as Hamas is gaining support. 

Education: Massive open online courses (MOOC, for short, "College of Future," from headline-writers) provide elite education opportunities to a vast number of people, but may affect lower-tier colleges that could face challenges in convincing students that what they offer is worth their money. 

U.S.: Though for years Santa Monica's Palisades Park had been a site of Nativity scenes, they are banned this Christmas, after a conflict last year involving atheist groups and their own displays. 

New York: The dunes on Fire Island helped the community avoid the worst of Sandy, but now they are gone as winter arrives. 

Business: The election and Hurricane Sandy served as roadblocks for retailers this holiday season.

Science: A project out of the Department of Homeland Security’s Science and Technology Directorate looks to stop flood waters from entering transportations by way of inflatable plug. 

Health: MDMA, or Ecstasy, is being researched as a drug that can potentially alleviate post-traumatic stress.

Sports: Ramon Dominguez, a self-taught, taller-than-average jockey, is dominating racing in the United States.

Opinion: Peter Diamond on the need for commissions in Congress.

Theater: Charles Isherwood reviews the musical version of A Christmas Story, which he says "wins points for being less glitzy and more soft-spoken than the garish, overbearing musical versions of 'How the Grinch Stole Christmas' and 'Elf.'"

Art & Design: Design changes needed post-Sandy don't face "technological" or "financial" problems, instead the challenging task involves "staring down the pain, dislocation and inequity that promise to upend lives, undo communities and shake assumptions about city life and society."