Get all of your costume-based partying out of your system this weekend, folks. Meteorologists are saying Sandy and her date, an unnamed Canadian winter storm, are still on a path to ruin Halloween for the East Coast, which will feel start feeling the storm's effect on Sunday night. "[T]he weather is ready to roar over the northern Atlantic Seaboard from later Sunday into Tuesday," writes the Accuweather's Senior Meteorologist Alex Sosnowski. And Weather Underground's Bryan Norcross wrote this morning, "The only way we can forecast the weather four or five days days from now is with the aid of these super-complex computer programs run on supercomputers. The two best, the European and the U.S. GFS (Global Forecast System) run by NOAA, are now in reasonable agreement that there IS going to be an extraordinarily unusual confluence of events that results in a massive storm."  Here's a current weather map from Google to put all that confluence and freak weather into something easier to digest: 

So, see that big red patch? That's the freezing Canadian storm lurching its way to the east coast to meet up with Sandy. And that blue line is basically Sandy's path. And where the two shall meet shall result in what's likely to be a disgusto-mix of weather phenomenon that will best be appreciated indoors. "Right now, it looks like the storm center will land between the Delmarva and New Jersey, which would put the entire Tri-State area of NJ, NY, and Connecticut on the bad side of the storm," writes Norcross, who adds, "If the storm comes in farther south, the Delmarva, Delaware Bay and maybe the Chesapeake will be at risk. A storm the size that's forecast would cause problems throughout New England as well, even if the center is south of New York." Ooof. 

The little tidbit of good news is that Sandy, according to Accuweather, will probably be declassified from her current hurricane-strength status by the time she gets to the East Coast. According to Fox News Latino, Sandy blasted through the Bahamas on Friday and has left 21 dead in the Caribbean. "The details of exactly where landfall occurs will not be apparent perhaps until the left turn actually begins this weekend," Accuweather's Chief Meteorologist said.