Now that The New York Times pay wall is live, you only get 10 free clicks a month. For those worried about hitting their limit, we're taking a look through the paper each morning to find the stories that can make your clicks count.

Top Stories: Young immigrants are preparing for the beginning of Obama's deportation deferral program, which starts Wednesday. Paul Ryan has sustained connections with conservative activists and donors "who have channeled Tea Party anger into a $400 million political machine, financed by a network of conservative and libertarian donors that now rivals, and occasionally challenges, the Republican establishment behind Mr. Romney." 

World: In Cancún an art project in which sculptures are submerged in the sea, also is a conservation effort, drawing the focus of divers and snorkelers "away from the Mesoamerican Reef." 

Politics: Michael Barbaro writes that "the most intriguing dimension of the Romney-Ryan partnership is the unmistakable sense that the two men thoroughly enjoy each other’s company." 

EducationA popular activity for kids in the Hamptons during the summer? SAT prep. 

New York: The incident in which a man brandishing a knife was shot to death by police officers near Times Square this past weekend was "a scene at once reminiscent of the bad old days and clearly removed from it."

Media & Advertising: An obituary for Helen Gurley Brown, who "was a Janus-headed figure in women’s history, simultaneously progressive and retrogressive in her approach to women’s social roles." 

Business: In Germany, businesses remain loyal to the euro

Science: The Environmental Protection Agency — which orchestrates Superfund program — is tackling some of its most challenging clean-up areas now. Scientists study the smell of fear

Sports: Pitcher R.A. Dickey "the primary reason" to keep following the Mets.

Opinion: Joe Nocera on Paul Ryan

Television: Jon Caramanica on the Lifetime series The Week the Women Went in which women leave a town and let the men and children deal on their own: "It’s 'The Twilight Zone,' but voluntary, and is predicated upon the rigidity of gender roles, in the town and also in the viewership."