Today in sports: Sandusky's day in court approaches, a labor fight threatens the Triple Crown, and Chris Bosh may return for the Heat's stand against the Celtics.

Saturday's Belmont Stakes is being threatened by a labor dispute between the state racing association and track workers. Maintenance crews and starters (who are essential to the smooth running of any race) have subtly threatened a strike just days before 100,000+ fans descend on Belmont Park for its most important event of the year. This year's race is even more anticipated than usual thanks to I'll Have Another's impressive wins in the Kentucky Derby and Preakness Stakes, setting up a run at the first Triple Crown in 34 years. We expect there will be deal by Friday — the race is too important not to happen — but the union's position has never been stronger. [New York Daily News]

Jury selection is underway in the trial of Jerry Sandusky, who is accused of sexually abusing several young boys while he was working as assistant coach at Penn State University. Hundreds of jurors will be screened over the next several days, though only three were selected after the first day of questioning. If all goes according to plan the trial will begin next week, with 328 credential reporters on hand. [The Patriot-News]

Chris Bosh is a "game time decision" for the Miami Heat tonight, who are desperately looking to regain their mojo after surrendering a 2-0 lead to the Boston Celtics in the Eastern Conference Finals. Bosh has yet to play in the series due to injury. [AP/Yahoo]

A high school junior in Ohio is winning praise and attention after she stopped in the middle of a race to help a runner from another school who had collapsed in front of her. Meghan Vogel was on the last lap of the 3,200 meter final at the state championship meet when she helped sophomore Arden McMath to her feet, then carried her across the finish line, making sure that McMath crossed first. Vogel also took first place in the 1,600 hours earlier. [Springfield News-SunESPN]

"Older lax bros — short for “lacrosse brothers” — tend to offer similarly vague definitions of the phenomenon, but it is easy to spot them. Lax bros display a certain understated confidence that critics call arrogance. They wear their hair long, a look known as “lettuce.” They dress in colorful board shorts, flat-brim hats, and bright half-calf socks. They carry lacrosse sticks, or “spoons,” on and off the field." Okay, then. [Boston Globe]