Now that The New York Times pay wall is live, you only get 10 free clicks a month. For those worried about hitting their limit, we're taking a look through the paper each morning to find the stories that can make your clicks count.

Top Stories: People of coal-producing regions continue to fight for the industry. Now that nearly everyone has mobile gadgets, the new "digital divide" is that kids in poorer families "waste" more time on games and social networking than those from more affluent families. Local communities are not just putting restrictions on where sex offenders live, but also banning them from most public spaces.

Opinion: Dissident Chen Guangcheng's says China's government needs to enforce its own laws.

World: A massive collection of not-so-secret underground tunnels supply Gaza with most of its economy. The Syrian nightmare may be Kofi Annan's last chance to rescue his diplomatic legacy.

Business: India's huge economy is slowing drastically. The money given to Greece for its bailout is going right back to the countries that loaned it by paying off debt interest. Japanese companies are traditionally reluctant to hire those who are educated overseas and return home for work.

Television: Three new programs examine our love affair with dogs.

Technology: Patent lawsuits are threatening to choke off tech innovation.

New York: The fire house on New York's City Island is in constant danger of being shut down due to high costs and lack of actual fires. A kid gets his life savings back after his mom recycled the old computer case that he was hiding his stash in.

Books: The "ice-pick-sharp" novel Gone Girl tells the story of a marriage through two conflicting and unreliable narrators.

Obituaries: Blind "flat picking" guitar legend Doc Watson.

Food: Chef Andy Ricker is "a high-profile ambassador" for Thai food despite having no cultural connection to the cuisine. 

Sunday Magazine: Scientist Craig Venter believes that tiny, genetically engineered bugs will solve many of our great natural challenges, like pollution, food production, and fuel. Fine art is valuable mainly as a way the super-rich to show off their wealth, not make more money off it. 

Photo Gallery of the Day: Lawrence, Massachusetts, fights its reputation as the "most godforsaken place" in the state.