Now that The New York Times pay wall is live, you only get 10 free clicks a month. For those worried about hitting their limit, we're taking a look through the paper each morning to find the stories that can make your clicks count.

Top Stories: The woman behind the Secret Service scandal tells her side of the story.  Immigrants in Arizona live their lives preparing for the worst in the shadow of tough anti-immigration laws. A NYPD officer is expected to make a full recovery despite getting stabbed directly in the brain. More on the medical procedures performed by the doctor who saved him.

Opinion: For the first time, three female Supreme Court justices heard a sex discrimination case and their side lost.

Politics: Democratic Senators are focusing on women's issues to combat Republicans in November. 

New York: There are concerns that the mafia is still a presence in Little Italy and the yearly San Gennaro festival. A man accused of rape was just released from custody even though the victim recanted her testimony about him 10 months ago. Three vintage warplanes have been evicted from the Intrepid museum to make room for the prototype Space Shuttle Enterprise that will arrive there soon.

Science: Many flowers are blooming earlier this spring than they ever have in the past.

Technology: A young Lebanese hacker is working with others to create online chat programs that can't be monitored by authorities.

Business: How the Instagram deal gives clues to Facebook's real value.

Fashion: It can be hard for some people to "break up" with fashion brands that they have been loyal to for years. Many men deal with the hair loss by simply shaving their head.

Books: Catholic commentator Ross Douthat has a new book about the troubles facing contemporary Christianity.

Theater: In a departure from most productions, the Broadway musical Godspell was funded by hundreds of investors putting up as little as $1,000 each.

Travel: Reviewing the formal options that allow travelers to skip lines at airports. 

Obituaries: Television legend Dick Clark.

Sunday Magazine: Anti-depression drugs have been a disappointment so far, but the science could still develop better treatments for sufferers.

Photo Gallery of the Day: The career of Dick Clark