Now that The New York Times pay wall is live, you only get 10 free clicks a month. For those worried about hitting their limit, we're taking a look through the paper each morning to find the stories that can make your clicks count.

Top Stories: The U.S. consulate's role in the Bo Xilai scandal is the stuff of international intrigue. Now that he's the presumptive nominee, Mitt Romney will have to take a more direct position on the Afghanistan war.

Politics: A look at Romney adviser Beth Myers, who will run the search for his VP.

New York: A Brooklyn school with 60 percent of students living below the poverty level won the national high school chess championship

Opinion: Novelist Ann Patchett is outraged that the Pulitzer broad didn't award a Fiction prize this year.

Business: Citigroup shareholders are the first bank stock owners to vote to reject a CEO compensation package.

Travel: The island where the Costa Concordia cruise ship crashed has seen a decline in overnight visitors, but a big rise in day trips from tourists who want to see the wreck.

U.S.: More Americans think that weather is getting worse and that global warming may be to blame. Massachusetts is using “accelerated bridge construction” to construct road bridges in a matter of days rather than months.

Advertising: Marketers are already flocking to Pinterest.

Books: The President's Club looks at the unusual ties that have bound our nation's former leaders together. Publishers are also upset about the Pulitzer's snub of fiction.

Food: The new fried pizza craze hits New York and a recipe for making your own dough at home.

Sports: The man under the most pressure in today's Champions League semifinal may be the referee.

Health: New studies shows that poor neighborhoods actually have a greater variety of food options than affluent ones, and that there's no link between the food sold in a neighborhood and obesity rates. Doctors are over-medicating elderly patients creating a much worse public health crisis.

Real Estate: Architect Kimberly Peck uses her own home to test new ideas for design.

Sunday Magazine: Can you train your brain to raise your IQ and make yourself smarter?

Science: California's backyard citrus trees are dying from widespread infection. Engineers successfully tested a new building designed to uphold California's highest earthquake safety codes and survive a massive temblor.

Photo Gallery of the Day: Tourists flock to the sunken Costa Concordia.