From 2008-2010, researchers in collaboration with Conservation International and TEAM Network gathered photographs captured by hidden, heat-sensitive cameras placed in protected areas that include Brazil, Costa Rica, Indonesia, Laos, Suriname, Tanzania and Uganda. These "camera traps" were used as the basis for a newly published habitat diversity study and served up 52,000 photographs of wild animals seemingly either quizzically peering at, approaching cautiously, or blatantly ignoring, their artificial presence.

As the Associated Press reported, the cameras were camouflaged, didn't have a flash and are only activated when something warm sneaks by. Below we've highlighted a few of our favorites from the camera trap mammal study's gallery. They include a curious, wide-eyed chimpanzee (pictured above), a jaguar who looks like he wandered right into the lens and an elephant whose tusk is visible as it lumbered past the camera trap:

Credit: Conservation International Suriname/TEAM Network Partnership

Credit: Wildlife Conservation Society/TEAM Network Partnership

Credit: Museo delle Scienze/TEAM Network Partnership

Credit: Wildlife Conservation Society/TEAM Network Partnership