The high-power team of lawyers defending Dominique Strauss Kahn has asked New York's prosecutors and law enforcement agencies for any available dirt on the Guinean-born Sofitel Hotel maid who says the former International Monetary Fund director tried to rape her. Today, the defense's request for discovery of evidence in the case, which it filed on Monday when Strauss-Kahn was arraigned, went up on the court's Web site, and the second item asks for toxicology reports, mental health reports, and records of criminal actions against any witness in the case. The maid's lawyer, Kenneth Thompson, has said she will testify in Strauss-Kahn's trial. Here's the document:

Of course, the discovery process is a normal part of any criminal trial, but in such a high-profile one like this, where both sides are keeping quiet about their strategies, it helps shed a little light on the tactics Strauss-Kahn's lawyers might use.

And there are some revealing tidbits hidden in here: For instance, the lawyers requested any photo and video from the Sofitel, Air France, the hotel employees' union, and McCormick and Schmick's seafood restaurant, suggesting that Strauss-Kahn, who said he had dined with his daughter before heading to catch a plane to Paris, ate at the restaurant. There's also a call for the return of Strauss-Kahn's iPad and cell phone, and a notice that voicemails received on the phone are not to be touched. Strauss-Kahn is reportedly a big chess fan, as reported in a recent Washington Times profile referenced here two weeks ago: "As a chess player--some say he plays up to two or three hours a days on his iPad--Strauss-Kahn understood the value of having a key role on the world's chess board." This latest gambit shows his lawyers also understand the defensive value of covering every angle of attack.