In 1999, MIT pioneered a breakthrough study on gender inequality that spurred colleges nationwide to fight discrimination in academia. Now, the latest MIT follow-up report to that original study has arrived (PDF), and debate has centered on a new problem: "Those who once bemoaned M.I.T.’s lag in recruiting women now worry about what one called 'too much effort to recruit women,'" noted the The New York Times.

Commenter LaTATOOiE had this response to the report:

Here's the thing... It's just like the racial quotas argument. Discrimination occurs on a regular, accepted basis throughout the decades/ centuries -- and a few years after remedies are effected/ enforced, complaints are heard about quotas and reverse discrimination. Y'all just need to ask yourselves how long you think a social remedy for decades or centuries of bias needs to be enacted in order to even marginally level the playing field in said area of discussion -- and stop whining every time redress of social bigotry begins to show signs of actually working. SMH

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