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Commentators are parsing yesterday's beer summit for meaning. Has American racial tension been healed yet? No? Well why not?!

The Daily Show's Jon Stewart, video above, "simulated" the beer summit, skewering the event's premise of racial reconciliation. Hot Air's Allahpundit joked of "The Drink-up That Saved America" with the headline, "White House kegstand solves nation's racial problems." Jules Crittendon recounts discussing with a black colleague how Obama could have done more:
The black guy wanted to know why Obama's first big racial reach-out move involves a Harvard professor who happens to be his pal and a Cambridge cop, and only happened because Obama stepped in it. How about someone from some place that has real, intense, life-and-death issues, including race, the black guy said. Where are the reformed gangbangers, the real people who are trying to turn things around? Yeah, said the white guy [Crittendon], good point. How about a couple of cold ones for people who are pushing social responsibility and self-reliance?
Sean Hannity also found the event lacking, lamenting Obama's failure to apologize and reaching a surprising conclusion:
One of the things that's bothering me here, the president didn't apologize. Gates didn't apologize. And they have successfully seemed to have moved this debate into an area where it really didn't belong. [...] Because here's a police officer that risked his life to save his property, put his life on the line, and he got yelled at and beaten up and called racist for no reason. And then this become -- then the president jumps in, not knowing any facts. He acted stupidly. [...] Sean Hannity believes the president is far more radical and extreme than he anybody wants to admit. I think he convinced the American people he's somebody that he's not. I think his radical associations prove this.
Attacking non-apologies is a new position for Hannity, who two months ago strongly criticized Obama for apologizing, declaring "No more apologies." Here's the segment (key quote: "apologizing didn't get the Allied Forces anywhere in World War II"):

Some did feel that racial progress, if slight, was made at the summit. Skip Gates himself wrote an impassioned essay praising "the great opportunity that fate has given us to foster greater sympathy among the American public." Ann Althouse says "nicely put." The Atlantic Ta-Nehisi Coates shrugged, "Meh, I guess." But most found the event largely meaningless, writing that the media circus of it all undercut any real racial conversation.