On Thursday, Malaysia Airlines flight MH17 was shot down over rebel-controlled Donetsk, Ukraine, killing all 298 passengers and crew members. The world's front pages focused on the wreckage — with the exception of Russia's papers. The lead stories on several Russian papers focused on food (and Angela Merkel's birthday), while the attack and it's devastating aftermath took center stage across the globe. 

Russia

Russian Gazette.  Accusations are flying between the Ukraine and Russia over who launched the surface-to-air missile that shot down the plane. "This tragedy would not have happened, if there had been peace on that land," President Vladimir Putin said during televised remarks. In other words — this has nothing to do with Russia. At least that's how the state-run media covered it. 

The lead story on the front page above is about Russian eating habits and statistics ("What You Should Eat"). At the bottom, below the fold, "Boeing Crash." 

Moscow Pravda. To the best of our ability, The Wire couldn't find anything on the front page about MH17. There's a story on how to cook soup, how credit cards increase spending, and stories about modern banking and luxury living.

Ukraine

Kyiv Post. Ukraine's paper's didn't bury the plane crash, but they also didn't focus on morbid pictures of the crash. The Post framed it as an extension of the conflict with Russia. 

Segodnya. Segodnya, which translates to Today, led with sanction talks as well.  

The Netherlands

Algemeen Dagblad. Approximately 154 Dutch citizens were on MH17 (the flight was from Amsterdam to Kuala Lampur). The top of the front page below reads (based on our translation) "Who shot down MH17 over the Ukraine? There were 154 Dutch certainly among the 298 victims, Families grieve at Schipol (Airport)." 

Malaysia

The Star. There were 27 Malaysian victims. 

The Rest of the World

The languages of the headlines change, but the the photos don't.