Days after Super Typhoon Haiyan hit the central Philippines, everyone's still getting a handle on the extent of the storm's damage. But as photos emerge, particularly from the hard-hit city of Tacloban, it's clear that Haiyan completely devastated large parts of the country. Officials have estimated that as many as 10,000 people may have died in Tacloban alone, with hundreds more deaths likely from around the nation. Because phone service is down in many areas, it's difficult for relief workers and other officials to get out the word on how badly hit other regions of the country might be. 

 Reports and images of just how badly some regions of the country were hit didn't emerge until Sunday. A video, at left, shows the scene from above Tacloban. The footage comes from Erel Cabatbat of TV 5 in the Philippines. Tacloban was reportedly hit by a storm surge that reached 13 feet as a result of the typhoon. But the destruction wasn't limited to that city. In Guiuan, for instance 100 percent of the structures have suffered some sort of damage. There will likely be even more of reports other devastated communities emerging as travel and communication between cities becomes easier. The Associated Press's lede on Sunday evening describes the scene that awaited survivors in the Tacloban: "Corpses hung from trees, were scattered on sidewalks or buried in flattened buildings," the AP wrote, adding, "Even in a nation regularly beset by earthquakes, volcanoes and tropical storms, Typhoon Haiyan appears to be the deadliest natural disaster on record." Officials know so little at this point about the extent of the storm's toll that Filipino media are publishing lists of known survivors

(Photo: AP. Residents gathering water at the edges of Tacloban City) 

(Photo: AP. Tacloban city) 

(Photo: Reuters. Survivors hang a sign in front of a Catholic church in Tacloban city.) 

(Photo: Reuters. Tacloban city) 

(Photo: Reuters. Empty coffins in the street of Tacloban city)

(Photo: Reuters. Tacloban city) 

(Photo: AP. Tacloban city)

(Photo: AP. Survivors carrying supplies, Tacloban city.)