The now-independent journalist Glenn Greenwald hinted which country would be the next target of his carefully orchestrated document leaks exposing the massive, intrusive spying operations, and it's our loveable, hapless neighbors to the north. 

Canada has so far kept a low profile on the Snowden spy leak front. The U.S., France, Britain Germany, Brazil and a handful of other countries have all had their day in the spying sun. A minor report about Canada spying on Brazil's mining and energy ministry angered Brazilians, but otherwise Canucks have avoided embarrassment from the endless trickle of documents released by former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden.

That will change, Greenwald cautioned in a recent interview with the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. The leaks are coming. "The documents are quite complex. There are a lot of them. There is enormous amounts of reporting to do in Canada, one of the most active surveillance agencies in the world, because of how closely they work with the NSA," Greenwald told CBC Radio's Day 6.

"There are many, many, many more significant documents about Canadian surveillance and partnership with the NSA that will be reported and, I think, will be quite enlightening for the people of Canada," he said. 

Canada has a two team system similar to the U.S.: the Canadian Security Intelligence Service, the frosty nation's answer to the CIA, and the Communications Security Establishment Canada, the answer to the NSA. The biggest difference, though, is how spy operations in Canada aren't as well respected or feared by locals as they are in the U.S. It's hard to take Canadian spies seriously when they keep falling into "honey pots," moving into already bugged buildings, and lighting their new facilities on fire