South America's first pope made his first trip back to South America and it sure looks like everyone had a lot of fun. Pope Francis's first overseas trip since being elected earlier this year was a visit to the Catholic Church's annual World Youth Day is Rio de Janeiro, which is also gearing up to host both the World Cup and the Summer Olympics in the next three years. Even though he is from neighboring Argentina, the Brazilians welcomed him with open arms and plenty of fanfare. 

The five-day trip wasn't totally without its glitches. The subway broke down one day, stranding thousands of worshippers who were hoping to get to the Pope's massive Mass on the beach. Demonstrations that roiled the city in recent months continued after his arrival, and the people who normally follow around the pope to protest organized religion could be found too. (Saying he wanted "trouble in the dioceses" probably didn't sit well with a few people either.) But in general the crowds were friendly, enthusiastic and huge. An estimated two million people came out for the Youth Day event and the Pope's Mass, despite heavy rains that soaked the city during the week.

Photo: AP Photo/L'Osservatore Romano

In fact, they might have been a little too enthusiastic. Pope Francis — who visited a Rio slum on foot during his trip — has eschewed the heavy security that has typically accompanied his office in recent decades, and has even swapped out the tank-like "popemobile" used by his predecessor for a more open-air model that puts him closer to the people. Closer than his security team would probably like, unfortunately  When his non-popemobile motorcade got stuck in traffic on Monday, the car was swarmed by onlookers trying to reach into the open car window to touch him.

All things considered, though, the trip has mostly been a success. It's also proof, once again, that Pope is a big star no matter where he goes. Check out some more pictures from the trip below.

AP Photo/Luca Zennaro

AP Photo/Victor R. Caivano

AP Photo/Felipe Dana

AP Photo/Domenico Stinellis

AP Photo/Victor R. Caivano

A man holds a sign with a message urging faithful to break with organized religions (AP Photo/Silvia Izquierdo)

AP Photo/Domenico Stinellis

AP Photo/Felipe Dana

AP Photo/Felipe Dana

AP Photo/L'Osservatore Romano

AP Photo/Felipe Dana