Beijing isn't the only city with a bad smog problem. Mexico City has a long and sad history with air pollution, too, though it's been trying for years to make things better. Here's the latest: a building that "eats" smog.

As this article from Bloomberg Businessweek details, a facade, created by a German company called Elegant Embellishments, was built on a local hospital. It's coated with a "special pigment" called Prosolve 370e that can breaks down air pollutants into elements such as carbon dioxide and water. And it's not a filter, either -- the pigment doesn't have to be replaced. It can work its magic until it naturally wears off in about a decade.

It "eats" quite a bit, too. Elegant Embellishments co-director Daniel Schwaag told Businessweek that third party testing showed that the facade can break down a day's worth of smog produced by the "8,750 vehicles in Mexico City." Could this smog-eating technology come to America soon? We could certainly use it.