Iran says its offshore oil and gas platforms have been targeted for cyberattacks in recent weeks, but that they managed to successfully repel the attempts to bring down their drilling stations. The head of information technology for the Iranian Offshore Oil Company blamed the attacks on "the regime occupying Jerusalem and a few other countries," but claims that no damage was done. None of the usual suspects (Israel and the United States) is talking.

While there has been much worrying about a possible air battle between Israel and Iran, it appears that their war is already well underway in the digital realm. The Iranian nuclear program has already been hit by malicious computer programs several times and the nation is trying to build its own private internet to combat security concerns. (And maybe keep its own people in line.) Now the oil industry, which is beleaguered by international sanctions, is under assault as yet other avenue for undermining the already struggling Iranian economy. (A pipeline between Iran and Turkey was also hit by a blast today, but that looks more like an attack on Turkey by Kurdish separatists.) No matter who is really to blame it has become more obvious than ever that when nations do battle from now, computer warfare will be just as important as guns and bombs.

Of course, this stealth war won't remain stealthy forever if, as some have speculated, that mysterious drone that was shot down over Israel this weekend actually came from Tehran. Don't worry. The old ways of fighting wars are still pretty popular too.