When Russian Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev said Pussy Riot had spent enough time behind bars, it raised hopes that they could be released at their next court hearing on Monday, Oct. 1. But in a new interview from prison, the band does not sound all that hopeful. GQ's Michael Idov has published an interview with Nadya Tolokonnikova and Masha Alyokhina, each serving two-year sentences. IT was a tough interview to get:  lawyers smuggled in Idov's questions and the answers from the third bandmate serving time, Katya Samutsevich, were confiscated by prison officials. Tolokonnikova and Alyokhina didn't address next Monday's hearing, but they did make it clear that they do not like prison at all and didn't sound like they're planning to leave any time soon. 

On the rumor that the band is receiving VIP treatment in prison:  "Did Auschwitz have VIP death lounges? If yes, then I suppose you can call our conditions VIP treatment," says Nadya

On day-to-day life in the prison: "Here in Russia, a prisoner has no Internet access, no computer, not even a typewriter ... After 6 a.m., you're not allowed to sleep under a blanket. Theoretically, until lights-out at 10 p.m., you're not allowed to sleep at all, but in practice you can lie on top of the blanket and cover yourself with your coat," says Masha.

On their state of mind. "Right now we're in hell here. It's hard living in a place where everyone can hate you because of something they heard on TV. That's why every gesture of support is so important and so much appreciated," says Nadya.

On their verdict. "This verdict is so dumb and cruel that it removes any lingering illusions about Putin's system. It's a verdict on the system," says Nadya. 

In a sign of just how sensitive the Pussy Riot verdicts still are in Russia, the furniture firm IKEA has removed a photograph from its Russian website in which models donned colorful balaclavas like the ones made famous by Pussy Riot. It looks like the move was at least self-censorship. As Reuters reports, a notice on the website confirms the image was removed, saying:

IKEA is a commercial organisation that conducts its activity outside of politics and religion. We cannot allow our advertising project to be used as a platform for campaigning of any kind. 

Regardless, with the appeal date one week away, we'll know soon enough if the Kremlin wants to maintain its hardline stance against a group it turned into international superstars or get the controversy behind it as soon as possible.