The Players: Benedict Garrett, a sex-ed teacher with alter-ego Johnny Anglais--stripper, naked butler, and adult film star; Norman Wells, a representative from the Family Education Trust--an organization believing "that parents are the natural protectors of their children, and, other than in exceptional cases, should always be involved in decisions about their welfare," and currently fighting sex-education in the United Kingdom

The Opening Serve: The Guardian reports that Garrett taught from 2008 until 2010, when he was suspended after some of his high school students saw him in a trailer for an adult film. Terese Wilmot, a headteacher at Garrett's school, then "informed the disciplinary committee that the school had a moral and social responsibility to the local community" reports the Guardian. Wilmot, who also led his disciplinary investigation, says that the school was "very pleased" with the standard of Garrett's teaching, says the Guardian's report, although the same report notes "concerns about his 'over-familiar'" manner on his subject and his Facebook friendships with students--befriending students on social networking sites is against school policy. England's General Teaching Council, on Wednesday, allowed Garrett to teach--so long as he doesn't "perform" again and acknowledges their judgment. Derek Johns, chairman of the council, delivered the verdict. "[T]he committee is content that you [Garrett] recognise the widely held public view that such work is not acceptable conduct for a teacher," said Johns. "Benedict Garrett is being naive if he imagines that performing as a stripper and appearing in porn films is compatible with teaching responsible attitudes towards sex and relationships as a teacher of personal, social and health education," Wells told the BBC. "The vast majority of parents would be uncomfortable, to say the least, to have their children taught by someone involved in the sleazy world of the sex industry."

The Return Volley: Garrett defended his part-time jobs. "What is wrong about it? I can't see anything," Garrett said to the BBC. "I don't think I've done anything that goes against my values and I worked incredibly hard as a teacher. During his hearing, Garrett said that it was important to recognize that "teachers have private lives," reports the Telegraph. "They may go out and get drunk off their faces...They are human and if they are doing it and it is legal that is their choice." Garrett said he wasn't a role model, either: "If teachers are role models, why do we tolerate teachers who smoke, when smoking is linked to thousands of deaths? Do we look at teachers who are fat and say you shouldn't be teaching? Obesity is linked to thousands of deaths," he said in the BBC report.

Today Garett, as Johnny Anglais, penned a column for the Guardian. "Anyone under the age of 18 viewing pornography in this country is doing so illegally. I would not condone them doing so," Anglais wrote. "However, I do not see that the viewing sexual intercourse, or witnessing human nudity, poses any threat or danger to that child."  Garrett added:

Pornography, in its simplest form (and I accept that there are unsavoury parts of the industry, including the exploitation of women and men – but then there are unsavoury aspects in most industries) is about the depiction of a legally consenting adult having sex with another legally consenting adult (or more, why should numbers matter?) What, in essence, is wrong with that process...

When it comes to porn and our society, we desperately need to start putting things into perspective. Porn is going nowhere – we had better learn to deal with it in a grown-up way. And young people aren't machines that we can indoctrinate with our irrational fears and prejudices. They are far too clever for that.

What They Say They're Fighting About: Who should or shouldn't be teaching children. Clearly both sides are divided on this subject. The Council in its decision and Wells both feel that there's a moral standard that teachers should be held to, and that stripping/being an adult film star clearly violates that standard. Obviously Garrett disagrees and points to the teachers who smoke, drink, and are obese and how they're allowed to teach despite partaking in habits that could potentially cause death.

What They're Really Fighting About: The age-old argument of personal versus private life; the "danger" of the sex industry. Should someone who excels in their profession be measured against what they do in their personal life?  What if this profession involves children? The argument here isn't unlike how we judge and debate how professional athletes like Tiger Woods, musicians like Amy Winehouse, and politicians like former president Bill Clinton all fit into our approval spectrum. What Garrett is fighting for is personal privacy as long as it doesn't get into the way of teaching. Yet Wells argues that the majority of parents wouldn't want "to have their children taught by someone involved in the sleazy world of the sex industry" and sees Garrett as unfit to teach. That uncovers a second question in this fight: whether the sex industry is, in fact, dangerous and perverted. What separates Garrett from Tiger Woods, for example, is that Garrett is working with children, and he's not having affairs, but rather working as an exotic dancer and porn star. Sex offenders aren't allowed to work with children, and perhaps the implicit assumption here is that someone working in the "sleazy world of the sex industry" is somehow similarly perverted or dangerous, and should be kept from work in schools.

Who's Winning Now:  Garrett. Garrett, unlike Sean Loftis, Melissa Petro, and Tera Myers in the U.S., has fought and won the right to teach again. And his victory does open the conversation to teachers who have been dismissed or given up their posts because of an X-rated history. Garrett also brings up a good point about the legality of children seeing his films: if he is being punished, what about the parents of said children who are letting minors view the porn illegally? But no one knows what Garrett or Anglais's future plans are, as Johnny Anglais's popularity has risen with the media frenzy---he has nearly 1,000 followers on Twitter and nearly 2,500 fans on Facebook. If Garrett doesn't continue teaching, Wells can claim a victory, can't he?